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The physiology of Dreams

July 3rd, 2008 by autore | Posted in Developmental Psychology | 1 Comment » | 20,924 views | Send article | Print this article |


The transition from a state of wakefulness to one of sleep comes about gradually and coincides with reduced bodily functions. Once a physiological loss reaches the critical level, the left hemisphere(dominant hemisphere of our brain) is activated and starts building upon images, sounds and sensations: dreams, with the aim of restoring those chemical-physical values which belong to a state of wakefulness. Once restored a new loss occurs and the cycle repeats itself for the entire period that we are asleep. Dreams can raise the chemical-physical parameters but need to be continuously interrupted in order to avoid high levels thus the risk of waking us up. Continuous interruptions induce a deeper state of amnesia proportional to the interruptions. When we dream, lacking total access to our right hemisphere, we are without identity, nor do we remember anything rather, our mnemonic function is restricted to those events which have occurred during the day. We cannot conceive time, distance or residence. The sole mnemonic function which remains concerns space-time which is activated by rapid access connections to the right hemisphere. Both hemispheres must be activated when we awake and more so when rapid access connections to the right hemisphere become more frequent. In this case the greater number of space-time coordinates are achieved, the more dreams are linked to real life.

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One Response to “The physiology of Dreams”

  1. Ioffer Search Says:

    Continuous interruptions induce a deeper state of amnesia proportional to the interruptions. When we dream, lacking total access to our right hemisphere.Nice Topic

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